Content marketers are always faced with a balancing act of quality versus quantity. It becomes a balancing act because you arguably need both to achieve content marketing success. But time, budget constraints, staffing shortages and nearly a million other things that pop up every day prevent both quality and quantity from working together on a regular basis.

So when you have to choose sides, which do you chose?

The case for quality

Obviously, you don’t want to set out to lower your bar for quality. You are, in fact, trying to establish yourself and/or your brand as a thought and industry leader.

That means spelling, grammar and factual information just simply have to be there. You can’t position yourself as a healthcare expert if you’re misspelling words, using incorrect grammar and stating, “Eat all the steak, butter, candy and fast food you want! You’ll live longer.” Clients might want to believe that claim (heck, I’d like to), but the reality is that it’s simply not true and there are plenty of people online that are more than willing to refute your claim.

Producing a high-quality piece of content takes time – you have to research, possibly conduct interviews, edit your work and then edit your work again. And that’s where quantity can be impacted.

The case for quantity

If you want your content to be clicked on, pop up in Google searches, and generally perform well online, you have to produce it consistently. It might feel like you have to constantly churn out content in order to stay relevant. And that’s partially true.

The more frequently your produce content, the more opportunities you create to engage customers and the better the chances are that new potential customers will see it too. Frequency can improve your search engine rankings and fuel your inbound marketing strategy.

And the winner is…

Quality, quality, quality. If the goal for your brand’s content marketing is to position yourself or your organization as a thought leader, enhance your brand’s reputation, and provide value to your customers, quality trumps quantity. Creating quality content will ultimately cause customers to seek it out due to the trust you’ve built.

Generating mediocre or low-quality content may actually dilute the high-quality content you spent so much time and resources on to produce. After all, you don’t want to do anything that will cheapen the perception of your content and, thus, your brand.

Making a commitment to produce only high-quality content most likely means you’ll sacrifice the amount of content you generate simply because you’ll be spending more time on each individual pieces. But that’s perfectly fine.

As long as you’re still producing content on a regular basis, sacrificing quantity is ok (just not too much). The result of this sacrifice will be a more favorable view of your content and, therefore, an increased trust in your brand.

And that, my friends, is the whole purpose of content marketing in the first place.